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Government publishes Renters Reform Bill

The government has today, 16 June, published its white paper that will form the basis of its Renters Reform Bill.

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Published 16 June 2022

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  • Real Estate
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  • Real estate disputes

It will, as widely expected, extend greater protections to renters and will see the abolition of section 21 notices that allow landlords to remove tenants without reason – the so-called no-fault evictions.

The white paper, which will pave the way for legislation expected later this year, also proposes banning landlords from arbitrary rent reviews and blocking families with children or benefits recipients from renting properties. Tenants will be given the ability to reclaim rents if the standard of their home is deemed unacceptable. Landlords will also be unable to stop renters from keeping pets.

Landlords will be required to register with a, to be created, ombudsmen to settle disputes more cheaply and quickly, and local authorities to be given greater powers to act on anti-social tenants.

The government estimates that 13 million people live in privately rented accommodation with 46% of them aged under 35. Since 2019, some 230,000 private renters have faced no-fault eviction notices.

The government’s summary of the white paper can be found here.

The devil, will be in the detail and we will provide further comment, once we have reviewed the white paper fully.

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Shorter Reads

Government publishes Renters Reform Bill

The government has today, 16 June, published its white paper that will form the basis of its Renters Reform Bill.

Published 16 June 2022

Associated sectors / services

Authors

It will, as widely expected, extend greater protections to renters and will see the abolition of section 21 notices that allow landlords to remove tenants without reason – the so-called no-fault evictions.

The white paper, which will pave the way for legislation expected later this year, also proposes banning landlords from arbitrary rent reviews and blocking families with children or benefits recipients from renting properties. Tenants will be given the ability to reclaim rents if the standard of their home is deemed unacceptable. Landlords will also be unable to stop renters from keeping pets.

Landlords will be required to register with a, to be created, ombudsmen to settle disputes more cheaply and quickly, and local authorities to be given greater powers to act on anti-social tenants.

The government estimates that 13 million people live in privately rented accommodation with 46% of them aged under 35. Since 2019, some 230,000 private renters have faced no-fault eviction notices.

The government’s summary of the white paper can be found here.

The devil, will be in the detail and we will provide further comment, once we have reviewed the white paper fully.

Associated sectors / services

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