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Landmark employment reforms to be abandoned

The Employment Bill was first promised in December 2019 and dubbed a ‘landmark’ piece of legislation.

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Published 6 May 2022

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  • Specialisms
  • Business
  • Services
  • Employment law for employees
  • Employment law for employers

The Employment Bill was first promised in December 2019 and dubbed a ‘landmark’ piece of legislation. The first tranche of changes came into effect in early 2019, which included extending the right for workers to receive a written contract of their terms and conditions from day one of their engagement.

Since then many of the remaining provisions have been delayed with calls for the government to ensure that the Bill is given due time and attention this year in parliament, particularly given the mounting financial pressures on the most vulnerable.

However, the government has reportedly omitted the Employment Bill from the forthcoming Queen’s speech. It would have introduced new protections for the lowest paid requiring restaurants to hand over all service charges and tips to staff, introduced greater protection from discrimination for pregnant employees and given the right to request flexible working from the outset of employment. .

In a statement published on the GMB website, Acting General Secretary Warren Kenny is quoted saying:

“We have been fobbed off repeatedly by Ministers with promises to level up workers’ rights with an Employment Bill. Well, the Bill is still missing in action.

The Government promised to make the UK the best place in the world to work, while it is leaving bosses free to use nefarious tactics like fire and rehire with impunity.”

Only time will tell if and when this legislation is introduced with the timing influenced by various political and economic considerations.

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Shorter Reads

Landmark employment reforms to be abandoned

The Employment Bill was first promised in December 2019 and dubbed a ‘landmark’ piece of legislation.

Published 6 May 2022

Associated sectors / services

Authors

The Employment Bill was first promised in December 2019 and dubbed a ‘landmark’ piece of legislation. The first tranche of changes came into effect in early 2019, which included extending the right for workers to receive a written contract of their terms and conditions from day one of their engagement.

Since then many of the remaining provisions have been delayed with calls for the government to ensure that the Bill is given due time and attention this year in parliament, particularly given the mounting financial pressures on the most vulnerable.

However, the government has reportedly omitted the Employment Bill from the forthcoming Queen’s speech. It would have introduced new protections for the lowest paid requiring restaurants to hand over all service charges and tips to staff, introduced greater protection from discrimination for pregnant employees and given the right to request flexible working from the outset of employment. .

In a statement published on the GMB website, Acting General Secretary Warren Kenny is quoted saying:

“We have been fobbed off repeatedly by Ministers with promises to level up workers’ rights with an Employment Bill. Well, the Bill is still missing in action.

The Government promised to make the UK the best place in the world to work, while it is leaving bosses free to use nefarious tactics like fire and rehire with impunity.”

Only time will tell if and when this legislation is introduced with the timing influenced by various political and economic considerations.

Associated sectors / services

Authors

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